Workshops

Friday, July 8

Friday’s pre-conference workshop offerings are virtual events and available for selection to all registrants. Access information for the virtual workshops will be emailed prior to the event.

8:00 – 9:00 a.m. Pacific Time

MEGA is the software that helps in alignment of sequence especially plant DNA. MatK and rbcL primer are ideal markers for finding the taxonomic relationship of plants. In this era, lot of taxonomic revisions are happening. Use of molecular taxonomy along with classical taxonomy help in developing a clear cut idea on tracing the evolutionary relationship of plants. New plant world emphasizes on plant artificial intelligence. The latest technologies and tools help in identify the plant in species level and tackle taxonomic problems. This simple software can be used by the young one to align the sequence and identify the distinguishing aspect in plant sequences.

9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time

The most important thing you can do as you prepare your talk is to write a good title. The best titles communicate your main result in clear, easy to understand language. A good title helps you write a good abstract. They help you focus your abstract on your main result. This is what your audience will come to hear. A focused title and good abstract will draw a bigger audience because they will know what to expect before they arrive. They will know your main point and will be eager to learn more about your research. This workshop will focus on writing titles and abstracts. The first hour will focus on titles. After some examples, you will have the chance to work on your title and get feedback from your peers. The second hour will focus on abstracts. We will use examples to show how to write a clear abstract: an abstract that will draw people to your talk. This workshop is for anyone who wants to present clear, easily understood technical talks. Please come prepared with a draft of your title and, if possible, a draft of your abstract.

9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time

The dynamic environmental conditions pose a serious threat to the survival of sessile organisms of ecosystem, i.e. plants. These environmental cues lead to deterioration of the growth potential of plants as it disturbs their normal metabolism along with interfering with ROS signaling. However, the practice of using phytohormones to inculcate stress tolerance in plants and enhancing productivity has outperformed over any other practices like use of environment degrading chemicals and breeding programs. It seems to be cost-effective and promising practice that delivers long term benefits not only to plants but also to the human race that focuses on enhancing the agricultural output in order to serve the gigantic and ever expanding population. During the past years, several researches have been conducted where the role of phytohormones and their signaling has been studied under stress conditions. It is very interesting and astonishing to find such promising results of very low concentrations of plant hormones which make it a cost effective technique that can be explored to enhance productivity of plants even under conditions of stress. The workshop is apt to instigate young researchers, graduates and faculty who wish to initiate their research in the field of phytohormone signaling and its utilization to draw maximum benefits from the agricultural plants even when exposed to stress conditions. Phytohormones have been known to play all the physiological roles in the plants. However, their emerging role of developing stress tolerance in plants would be the highlight of the workshop. The two major stress hormones, Brassinosteroids (BRs) and Jasmonates (JAs) have attracted the researches with their versatile properties and promising potential of shielding the plants when exposed under conditions of environmental stress. The versatile structure, properties, physiological importance of BRs in plants and benefits for human race will be a key focus of the workshop where the eminent scientist in the field of BRs will share their reservoir of knowledge and it will be interesting to find the uniqueness of these plant steroids. On the other hand, the oxylipin class of plant hormones that is the JAs and their function and signaling will be quite interesting to study to relate their role of providing stress protection. The structural properties and their signaling are of greater interest for their commercial exploitation to protect growth and productivity of the plants under dynamic climates. These phytohormones are capable of initiating wide array of signaling responses both at biochemical and molecular levels helping in sustainable agriculture production. They also trigger responses of several stress related transcription factors in a highly regulated manner to initiate a growth promoting and stress tolerating responses in plants. In present dynamic climatic scenario, BRs and JAs play a vital role in stress management of plants which need to be understand at various physiological, biochemical and molecular levels and to be exploited at commercial levels for sustainable agriculture.

9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time

The crop plants are attacked by a number of pathogens that suppress annually over 10% of the yield. It has been demonstrated that pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognize a class of receptors known as PAMP recognition receptors to trigger broad-spectrum immunity against a number of pathogens. This broad-spectrum immunity is known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). In addition to PTI, plants carry nonhost immunity that provides another layer of broad-spectrum and durable resistance against all pathogenic organisms causing diseases in other plant species. The nonhost immunity is a less studied area of disease resistance mechanisms. Both PTI and nonhost immunity are ideal for enhancing broad-spectrum disease resistance in crop plants. In this concurrent session, in addition to providing recent advances in the mechanisms of PTI and nonhost immunity, application of these mechanisms in enhancing broad-spectrum disease resistance among crop plants will be addressed.

9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time

Since 2016, I have been contacted by 45 laboratories from 12 countries about the Ribo-seq technique and its data interpretation and analysis. Although we strive to provide detailed methods in publications, deposit sequencing data in public databases, share analysis codes in GitHub and publish analysis packages 1–3, this is simply not enough.

To facilitate efficient communication and the better use of existing Ribo-seq data, in collaboration with the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB), an informatics workshop focusing on Ribo-seq will be held in the ASPB annual meeting, in the second and fourth years of our NSF grant (2022 and 2024). This 2 hours long workshop will be composed of 4 parts: (1) Introduction to Ribo-seq, experimental workflow and alternative approaches. (2) Discussion of common computational software for Ribo-seq analysis and potential issues. (3) Introduction to databases for collecting and visualizing Ribo-seq data at the genomic level, and a hands-on activity using our R package designed to visualize the data at single-nucleotide resolution considering different transcript isoforms 3. A sample dataset has been included in our R package, so the participants will be able to practice on their own laptops. Graduate student and postdoc mentors will be tasked to assist the participants with specific questions during the hands-on activity. (4) Q & A for researchers to ask questions, share issues they have encountered, and discuss potential solutions. This workshop is expected to promote the reuse of existing Ribo-seq datasets, advance participants’ research by exploiting available resources, and facilitate discussion and communication among the community. The success of the workshop will be assessed based on several factors: number of attendees, attendees’ responses during the workshop, their evaluations at the end of the workshop, and feedback/recognition received after the workshop, such as acknowledgments in research publications.

10:00 – 11:30 a.m. Pacific Time

Plants play a critical role in sustainability due to its renewable nature.  To further improve their environmental impact, pathways in plants have been explored to enhance photosynthesis, to enhance resistance to biotic and abiotic stress, and to utilize inputs more efficiently. With increased awareness and engagement from consumers, the society is witnessing fast-growing trends on plant-based products (e.g. plant-based meat, biopolymers), indoor farming, carbon capture, etc.  In this workshop, industry experts in these emerging spaces will share their perspective of novel application of plant-based products and practices, impacts of sustainability initiatives, challenges they are facing, and types of research targets to address those challenges.  This interactive panel discussion will provide a platform for brainstorming ideas around utilizing plant-based solutions to improve sustainability, build bridges between basic research and applied research, and strengthen connections within the plant community.  We will conclude the session with topics on career paths in the field of sustainability and how early career scientists can prepare themselves for such opportunities.

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time

The crop plants are attacked by a number of pathogens that suppress annually over 10% of the yield. It has been demonstrated that pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognize a class of receptors known as PAMP recognition receptors to trigger broad-spectrum immunity against a number of pathogens. This broad-spectrum immunity is known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). In addition to PTI, plants carry nonhost immunity that provides another layer of broad-spectrum and durable resistance against all pathogenic organisms causing diseases in other plant species. The nonhost immunity is a less studied area of disease resistance mechanisms. Both PTI and nonhost immunity are ideal for enhancing broad-spectrum disease resistance in crop plants. In this concurrent session, in addition to providing recent advances in the mechanisms of PTI and nonhost immunity, application of these mechanisms in enhancing broad-spectrum disease resistance among crop plants will be addressed.

Saturday, July 9

9:00 – 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time

Current agricultural ecosystems are threatened by ongoing climate change and weather extremes, which affect crop production, biodiversity and dynamics of pests and diseases. We need to rethink the way we do agriculture in order to bridge the gap between productivity and resilience to environmental stresses. Climate-smart agriculture could help reduce emissions, enhance resilience and ensure sustainable livelihoods. The workshop promoted by the ASPB African Researchers Network aims to stimulate discussions on emerging tools in plant biology, climate science and artificial intelligence to improve climate-smart agriculture. In particular, the workshop will promote discussions among the scientific community, the private sector and the broader audience on four main areas: (1) understanding plant development, physiology and evolution to develop better adapted crops that meet local agricultural needs; (2) developing tools to deliver climate change vulnerability assessments to farmers; (3) carbon sequestration strategies to mitigate climate change; (4) communicating climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies. The workshop will feature talks by experts in each of the areas, and will also include perspectives from early career researchers and science communicators. Building on the success of the previous edition, the workshop will feature an agricultural technology hackathon to expand technology development in climate-smart agriculture. Over a 48-hour period, teams will be asked to hack possible solutions to a series of challenges, which could help guide actions towards climate-resilient agricultural and food systems. The interdisciplinary nature of the workshop and the broad representation of career stages, geographical contexts and audience types will give participants the opportunity to learn, to network with the international plant science community, and to develop winning ideas to build resilient agricultural systems.

The four main hackathon themes include: (1) Plant stress biology; (2) Climate change vulnerability assessments; (3) Carbon sequestration and climate change mitigation strategies; (4) Communicating climate change mitigation and adaptation.
Information on team formation and challenges will be emailed to registered participants ahead of time. Mentors will be assigned to each team to guide the development of potential solutions. The winning teams will be selected and awarded various prizes.

Registration form 
Deadline to register: Thursday, June 30, 2022 11:59PM PST

8:30 a.m. – noon Pacific Time

This workshop will focus on the topic of promoting plant awareness and the importance of plant research, particularly from the perspective of Primarily Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs). The workshop will start with a keynote talk by Dr. Kathryn Parsley, an Education Project Manager and Postdoctoral Researcher at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis, MO. Her research focuses on plant awareness disparity (PAD, formerly known as plant blindness) and functional botanical literacy (FBL) and she will share about approaches for dealing with these issues. The second part of the workshop will have facilitators direct group discussions to tackle issues important to plant awareness at PUIs, such as conveying the importance of plant research to our colleagues and funders, to the general community and to our students. 

Participants will work in groups to discuss strategies for promoting broader impacts of plant research and how to self-promote research for grants, evaluation, and collaborations. Each breakout group will brainstorm on how to tackle the problem with a goal of developing a tool or strategy to help solve the problem. At the end of each session, there will be time for group reporting of discussions. Discussion groups will have Facilitators to help direct meaningful conversations and record discussion and brainstorming results into an accumulated document that will be shared with all workshop participants and the larger ASPB PUI community.

9:00 – 11:30 a.m. Pacific Time

Phenomenon such as “bias”, “imposter syndrome”, and “stereotype threat” contribute to lack of self-confidence and impact academic and professional performance. Low representation in STEM fields and leadership deters women and individuals from other underrepresented groups from seeking STEM careers. Additionally, the learning process inherent to research – learning or creating new methods and asking novel questions – can be perceived as failure and reinforce imposter syndrome.

Jayhawks Breaking Barriers at the University of Kansas (JBB.ku.edu), was founded by graduate students and post-docs to address the needs we saw on campus and in our own educations. It began as a workshop series and became a popular course that enables students to explore STEM careers while practically discussing the difficulties of doing science. Careers and professional development are frankly discussed in terms of diversity of experiences, both as an asset for increasing innovation and to provide confidence-boosting strategies as students embark upon their careers.

Student feedback has been positive. For example, after a panel discussion on resiliency, one student noted in an exit survey, “It was especially comforting hearing such successful people discuss their failures. That is something you don’t get to hear often.” Another said, “The biggest trait I believe that I received from my time in class is confidence. The confidence to not only speak to people I admire but, [to] seek them out. It was given to a perfect foundation in which to start my career.”

In our workshop, we will present our three-pronged structure – career exploration, professional development through the lens of diversity, and mentorship – as well as strategies we use within our classes to build student self-confidence and resiliency. These strategies can be utilized together or separately for implementation within a traditional STEM classroom, extracurricular programming, or through department- or university-level courses.

9:00 – 11:30 a.m. Pacific Time

Early career plant scientists primarily receive their training in academic institutions where they are mentored and surrounded by professors. As such, their career aspirations are often biased toward becoming a professor. Although pursuing this career path is noteworthy and potentially rewarding, it is not the only viable and fulfilling pathway available. Furthermore, the competition for academic positions is extremely high and the reality is that only a small percentage of graduates succeed in securing one. Thus, for this workshop, we will provide participants with a broader perspective of diverse plant science career opportunities so they can become better informed about the career development steps they need to take to achieve their career goals. 

Each participant will be randomly assigned to one table with one panelist stationed there. While participants will be free to ask their own questions, sample questions will be provided to help engage people who are hesitant to ask questions. During the first 8 minutes of the workshop, the panelists will be introduced, and the format of the event explained. Then, every 10 minutes, each panelist will rotate to a new table thus allowing all participants the opportunity to learn about each career type. The final two minutes will be used to thank the panelists and provide the participants with instructions and/handouts for “keeping the conversation going”. As a result of this event, we anticipate that participants will be better equipped to network with other professionals in the future.

9:00 – 11:30 a.m. Pacific Time

In the plant sciences of the future, high-precision prediction of emergent plant behavior and crop performance will be driven by basic research as well as crop and forest management. The power of predictive biology is, however, only realized with deeper and broader insights on plant system performance.

There is immense untapped opportunity in leveraging automated measurement, monitoring, perturbation solutions to transform the pace of plant science research. The combination of automation, robotics, sensing, real-time data handling and advanced computational approaches such as AI/ML has brought about a paradigm shift and transformed the throughput, efficiency, reliability, and predictability of systems analysis across a wide range of fields (e.g., manufacturing, pharmaceutical, food sorting and packaging, and robotic imaging and surgery). This potential for innovative bio-automation technologies to transform the pace of plant research is exciting. The present workshop seeks to bring together interested ASPB community members from across a spectrum of expertise level (novice to expert) to provide a platform to inform, learn, synergize, and co-identify a list of top needs, barriers and opportunities for automated solutions in lab, greenhouse and field settings.

10:00 – 11:30 a.m. Pacific Time

Current research advancements have shown a significant contribution of big data to get better conclusions. In most research areas, including plant breeding, genetics, biology, biochemistry, there is a need to collect genotypic or phenotypic data. These areas are well researched in most model crop species but still need much exploration in the non-model crop species.

This workshop will consist of three 15 minutes presentations each followed by a 15-minute discussion. The workshop will be open to all members of ASPB community willing to get a perspective of bigdata in plant biology. A take-home hand on exercise/cheat-sheet will also be provided to the participants to understand and analyze big data. The workshop will focus on big data for omics approaches including genomics, transcriptomics and phenomics for crop improvement.

10:00 a.m. – noon Pacific Time

When performing gene expression analyses, we typically generate an output comprising differentially expressed genes (DEGs). The next step is to take a DEG list and discern biological relevance. While it is possible to look at genes one by one, doing so can be time consuming and can lead to confusing/misleading results. Alternatively, one can perform pathway analyses to better understand which pathways/gene networks to which DEGs are connected. There are many different methods to perform pathway analysis, and it is oftentimes unclear which method is superior for a given scenario. Therefore, we will present various approaches for pathway analysis, as well as their pros and cons, during a presentation (45 min). During the second half of the workshop, we will do a hands-on tutorial to show how pathway analyses are performed. We will provide the necessary codes and example datasets. The audience will need to bring a computer to do the analyses. Knowledge of programming language R is helpful but not required.

10:00 a.m. – noon Pacific Time

Although we often study small pieces of plant systems in great detail, these systems exist within a larger, highly complex context. Multi-scale modeling is a quantitative approach to integrate our knowledge of sub-systems and individual components across biological and spatial scales. Multi-scale models may consider information from a variety of disciplines, including biophysics, biochemistry, genetics, physiology, and ecology by linking models of two or more phenomena. Considering plant systems in such a cross-disciplinary way can deepen our understanding and discover new phenomena that are otherwise challenging to observe.

What: Participants will first be introduced broadly to multi-scale modeling. This will be followed by examples of multi-scale modeling in plant biology by experts in the field. Introductions will focus on the biological problem, motivation for model development, and model outcomes. During the workshop, participants will be put into small groups of 4-5 individuals to allow for discussion.

Why: The additional insight obtained through the multi-scale modeling approach will be emphasized to allow participants to consider both how this approach could inform their research, as well as the types of questions multi-scale models are posed to address.

How: Finally, discussions will be led between participants on expectations, research questions and objectives from the standpoint of developing a successful collaboration for a multi-scale modeling problem. Participants are welcome to discuss specific questions relevant to their own research, or professional development questions related to multi-scale modeling and the quantitative approaches involved.

11:00 a.m. – noon

Network with other undergraduates as well as plant science professionals and other early career researchers as you think about the next steps in your career. No posters will be displayed at this session; however, if you have brought a poster to the conference, let people know your poster number and when they can expect to see you with it in the main poster hall. Light refreshments will be provided.

Monday, July 11

10:00 a.m. – noon Pacific Time

Current agricultural ecosystems are threatened by ongoing climate change and weather extremes, which affect crop production, biodiversity and dynamics of pests and diseases. We need to rethink the way we do agriculture in order to bridge the gap between productivity and resilience to environmental stresses. Climate-smart agriculture could help reduce emissions, enhance resilience and ensure sustainable livelihoods. The workshop promoted by the ASPB African Researchers Network aims to stimulate discussions on emerging tools in plant biology, climate science and artificial intelligence to improve climate-smart agriculture. In particular, the workshop will promote discussions among the scientific community, the private sector and the broader audience on four main areas: (1) understanding plant development, physiology and evolution to develop better adapted crops that meet local agricultural needs; (2) developing tools to deliver climate change vulnerability assessments to farmers; (3) carbon sequestration strategies to mitigate climate change; (4) communicating climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies. The workshop will feature talks by experts in each of the areas, and will also include perspectives from early career researchers and science communicators. Building on the success of the previous edition (https://aspb.org/newsletter/archive/2021/SeptOct2021.pdf), the workshop will feature an agricultural technology hackathon to expand technology development in climate-smart agriculture. Over a 48 hours period, teams will be asked to hack possible solutions to a series of challenges, which could help guide actions towards climate-resilient agricultural and food systems. The interdisciplinary nature of the workshop and the broad representation of career stages, geographical contexts and audience types will give participants the opportunity to learn, to network with the international plant science community, and to develop winning ideas to build resilient agricultural systems.

10:00 a.m. – noon Pacific Time

As scientists progress through their career, they first experience being mentees, and then become mentors. This cycle often repeats at each stage of their career, and both the way they are mentored and the way they mentor others, changes accordingly. Throughout this process, at its best, mentor-mentee relationships can be mutually rewarding and invigorating; but at their worst, these relationships can be disappointing and disheartening. Despite the central role of mentoring in the scientific field, formal mentor training is not a required component of most scientist’s education.

This workshop seeks to partially address this problem by providing participants with concrete strategies for how to mentor trainees at different career stages and how to implement these strategies with diverse scientists. The topics that will be covered include becoming a culturally aware and inclusive mentor, building confidence in a mentee, developing a mentoring philosophy, and exploring time-management strategies for mentoring. The workshop will be divided into two parts. In Part I, a trained mentoring facilitator from the Center for the Improvement of Mentoring Experiences in Research (CIMER) will provide participants with the essential tools to develop a beneficial mentor-mentee relationship. During Part 2, a panel of 3-4 plant scientists experienced in mentee training will discuss their experiences and strategies for mentoring at the undergraduate, graduate and postdoc levels. The panel will take questions during the workshop, but we will also ask participants to send questions prior to the workshop.

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time

Learning how to communicate the importance of your research and effectively advocate for science-based policies is an essential skill for plant biologists to develop.  How you discuss science with other researchers is different from how you would communicate science to those outside your field.   Policymakers, funding agencies, and university administrators want to know why your research should be at the top of their agenda. They need justification for why they should support funding for your research, which may seem abstract to them.   In this workshop, you will learn how to explain your research to non-scientist professionals in a 3 minute elevator pitch. A local science policy expert will give advice on best practices and share their experiences. Participants will then create their own elevator pitch and share it within their groups for feedback.

10:00 a.m. – noon Pacific Time

This annual workshop has introduced and updated hundreds of plant biologists on a variety of digital research resources, particularly online bioinformatics websites and knowledgebases, that are valuable for gathering background information, generating hypotheses, designing experiments, and analyzing data. Each year, the talks focus not only on recent improvements and new features at long-standing community knowledgebases and websites but also on brand new bioinformatics resources. There will be a combination of overview talks and application talks which illustrate the use of specific resources with real-world examples. The workshop presents an overview of the bioinformatics landscape in plant biology to scientists who are starting out in this field. At the same time, established plant biologists will benefit from the consolidation of updates spanning multiple resources together with introduction of new options.

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time

The last two years have made it easy to see we must be the change needed to improve diversity in academia. But how? Join us to learn from a panel of people just like you who have made inroads to diversity advocacy in their own lab environments. This will be an interactive session in which you will be in a small group focused on identifying challenges to diversity advocacy and their solutions.

10:00 – 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time

This workshop will offer a chance for undergraduates and others to practice interviewing skills. There will be an introduction with interviewing tips, followed by practice interviews.  The focus will be on interviewing for grad school, but others might find this workshop useful.

10:00 a.m. – noon Pacific Time

This hands-on, interactive workshop is designed to provide early-career researchers (ECRs) with an opportunity to learn the key aspects of scholarly peer review, centering around equity, diversity, and inclusion. The workshop has the following goals:

  • Provide an overview of the current state of peer review identifying barriers to participation for ECRs, challenges and areas that can be improved;
  • Provide guidance and resources to self-assess biases and write constructive, clear, and actionable manuscript reviews;
  • Offer a safe space to exchange experiences, learn together, and connect with peers;
  • Provide resources for participants to stay connected and engage in collaborative open peer review of preprints, building their public profile as constructive preprint reviewers.

10:00 a.m. – noon Pacific Time

Plant genomes are dominated by repetitive transposable elements (TEs), which most researchers attempt to avoid during their daily work. The era of genomics and CRISPR has allowed plant biologists to work on virtually any plant, including crops, but these large genomes are 50%-95% TEs. Although researchers try to ignore these non-genic regions, TEs consistently befuddle genomic, bioinformatic, mapping and single-gene analyses. Common mistakes include the complete masking of repetitive DNA, only using the unique fraction of deep sequencing reads, and ignoring the role of TEs in the regulation of a favorite gene. The approaches used to avoid TEs often skews results and leads to false findings and a lack of data reproducibility.

As a community, plant biologists need to be educated and trained with better tools to handle the TE portion of plant genomes. This workshop will assemble a diverse set of key researchers who understand these problems that academic and industry researchers encounter due to TEs. They will disseminate to the community cutting edge understanding of TEs and best-practices to combat the common problems. The goal of this workshop is to empower the attendees to get the most and best out of their data.

This workshop will be led by researchers who think about TEs on a daily basis, and provide information to all academic and industry researchers, including undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, technicians and principal investigators about how to manage research in genomes where TEs are everywhere. This Workshop will leverage the similar successful workshop from PlantBio2020. The topics will range from genome-wide bioinformatics to single-gene wet-bench research approaches.

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Pacific Time

We all spend countless hours working to be successful researchers. Similarly, searching and applying for a job takes time, dedication, focus, and most importantly, preparation.

 No matter what your current professional situation is, from considering applying to graduate school to being ready to say goodbye to your postdoc to enter the next phase of your career, it is never too early to develop a strategy for implementing an effective career plan.

From exploring potential career paths to applying for a position in academia, agencies, industry, or in a non-government organization, this interactive workshop will provide practical tools for you to :

 – Assess your skills, values and interests;

 – Identify career paths aligned with your core values;

 – Establish SMART goals;

 – Develop your actionable career plan.

Leveraging additional materials from the NIH-funded Postdoc Academy (https://www.postdocacademy.org/) Massive Open Online Course “Succeeding as a Postdoc” that already helped over a thousand online learners develop their career plan, we will share a wide range of online resources that can help inform your career transition, regardless of your background or career goals.

 We will also discuss strategies to help you connect with your peers and ways you can get involved within your community to help you develop or strengthen key competencies such as leadership, communication or interpersonal skills.

Designed to support undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral scholars in their professional and career development endeavors, you will be able to effectively use the materials of this workshop the moment you step out of the room. Beyond benefiting your own careers, you will also enhance your mentoring capacity and knowledge to guide your mentees in their own career planning journey.

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Pacific Time

Prior to the workshop, participants will brainstorm at least one topic that requires an assessment plan. At the workshop, the first portion of the workshop will involve facilitator-led discussions about data-informed teaching and its importance, the value of assessment, and some general strategies that can be used to assess a variety of outcomes (e.g., student learning outcomes, proposed grant outcomes, broader impacts outcomes, and improvement of your own teaching/mentoring/research). Participants will then break into small groups (based on the topic they pre-selected for assessment development) and will work with facilitators to identify and generate an assessment plan for their personal use. In this way, they will both learn how to generate assessment tools and will leave the workshop with a viable (at least start) for one that they can use.

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time

If you are interested in linking whole-plant, leaf or root, and molecular scales or in understanding plant environmental responses, welcome home! We will highlight current work of early career researcher and a keynote speaker in the field of plant environmental physiology. We will provide time for lightning talks from early career researchers (3) and one keynote speaker who will highlight the current state-of-the-art in the field of environmental and ecological plant physiology. The other goal of this meeting will be to provide members and interested participants with up-to-date information about recent and upcoming activities planned by the section, and future goals of the section and how this fits into the broader ASPB community. The Environmental and Ecological Plant Physiology (EEPP) section was the first theme-based section within the American Society of Plant Biologists. This section represents anyone interested in the broad category that our name implies. This section exists to provide a place to integrate leaf and plant- level responses to biotic and abiotic stress under field and laboratory conditions, to set molecular physiology in an ecological context, or to provide a basis for scaling root and shoot level responses to canopy, ecosystem and region for crops or natural vegetation. The mission of the section is to advance and promote the science and practice of Environmental and Ecological Plant Physiology.

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Pacific Time

Science publishing is an integral part of modern science and is subject to the same inequities and biases that limit the participation and inclusion of minorities and women scientists. In recent years analysis by a number of journals and publishers have highlighted the fact that even processes such as journal editing and manuscript peer-review are subject to biases and exclusion of scientists from marginalized groups. This workshop aims to highlight the challenges with EDI in how we publish and share our research. The workshop will also allow participants to learn from ongoing initiatives to improve EDI in science publishing in plant science and beyond and to learn how to adopt measures to combat bias and discrimination in their own work as editors, reviewers, and authors.

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time

This workshop will explore the dynamics of interpersonal relationships and the challenges underrepresented and marginalized folks in the plant sciences might face with these professional relationships. Prior to the workshop, workshop organizers will distribute a primer on personal and diversity statements. At the workshop, we will have a panel to discuss navigating graduate school with a diverse panel of former/current graduate students. We will then partake in a “think, pair, share” session walking though adverse interpersonal scenarios one might face as a graduate student. Participants will learn about the nuances between personal/diversity statements, interpersonal relationships, and how to overcome adverse scenarios in grad school.

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Pacific Time

Rigor and reproducibility are at the core of modern science. Many new initiatives and tools have been established to address barriers to reproducibility. While very welcome, these projects have led to a proliferation of online tools and resources which can be hard to sift through.

Reproducibility for Everyone (R4E) is a global, community-led reproducibility education initiative. R4E runs practical and accessible workshops to introduce the concept of reproducibility to researchers. We demonstrate reproducible tools and methods that can improve research by making it more efficient, transparent, and rigorous. Every R4E workshop is customized for the audience. For Plant Biology 2022, R4E instructors will focus on aspects of reproducibility most relevant to plant biologists and share resources and tools curated for the ASPB community.

This workshop will introduce reproducible workflows and a range of tools along the themes of organization, documentation, analysis, and dissemination. After a brief introduction to the topic of reproducibility, the workshop will provide specific tips and tools useful in improving daily research workflows. The content will include modules such as data management, electronic lab notebooks, reproducible bioinformatics tools and methods, protocol and reagent sharing, data visualization, and version control. All modules include interactive learning, real-time participation, and active knowledge sharing. The methods and tools introduced help researchers share work with their future self, their immediate colleagues, and the wider scientific community.

Following this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Apply a conceptual framework for reproducibility, replicability, and robustness of research.
  2. Explore practical, accessible tools and methods for advancing the reproducibility of research.
  3. Reuse and adapt the Reproducibility for Everyone modular curriculum to their own training and research needs.
  4. Evaluate their reproducibility barriers and solutions through interactive knowledge sharing.

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. Pacific Time

Professional societies exist to support all their members, and scientific conferences and journals are intended to serve all equitably. We want to hear from you about your experiences navigating your professional spheres, so that we can collectively identify and work to address processes that are inequitable or opaque. We are hosting an Idea Café* during which you will join with others to share your experiences attending professional society conferences, engaging as a member, submitting to or reviewing for journals, or other professional processes. Collectively we will identify barriers to full equity, inclusion, access, and belonging, and we will explore opportunities to overcome or eliminate those barriers.

When you register, you will be asked to select up to three topics you would be interested in discussing during the idea café. These topics include both processes and identities: Accessibility, Awards, Conference Culture, Editorial Processes, Gender Identity, LGBTQ+, Racial and Ethnic Identity, Society Opportunities. In the workshop room, tables will be labeled with selected topics, and when you enter you will sit at a table with a topic that interests you.

The first small group discussion period will last 20 minutes, during which participants will share their experiences navigating professional society spaces, with a focus on identifying barriers to equity, inclusion, access, and belonging. We ask you to consider how different identities might affect your ability to navigate these spaces.

We will reconvene as a large group to report on the barriers identified, and then breakout again to address some of these challenges more deeply. At the end of the second discussion period, each group will report on two suggestions they identified, one a small step and one a bold approach. The discussions will be summarized and shared with the steering committee of the NSF funded ROOT&SHOOT research coordination effort that seeks to “Root Out Oppression Together and Share Our Outcomes Transparently.”

* An Idea Café is a conversational method used to solicit ideas on a particular issue, problem or opportunity for which you are looking for creative suggestions. Listening to others’ verbalized experiences stimulates memories, ideas, and experiences in participants.

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Pacific Time

Researchers are often encouraged to engage with groups as diverse as social media, traditional media, institutional communications departments, the general public, program managers, and policy makers. This can have benefits including increased visibility for the researcher (which can lead to career building opportunities, such as speaker opportunities, award nominations), and the topic (which may increase funding opportunities).  Challenges can include the lack of training in how to tailor the message, lack of nuance particularly in short format media (perhaps leading to exaggerated claims), focus on the researcher rather than just the findings, and even harassment. The panel will discuss the advantages and disadvantages to engaging with these types of communication, and strategies for success. Participants will take back constructive action items with clear steps to implement towards their science communication goals.